2008 U.S. Women's Open

 

With all the talk about America’s best player that doesn’t own a major, a 23-year-old seeking to be the first to win a major in her professional debut and the swan song for one of the game’s greats, somebody somehow forgot to mention a 19-year-old Korean whose established quite a solid USGA résumé.
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At age 43, Helen Alfredsson is well aware that her opportunities to win a U.S. Women’s Open are fleeting, if not finished. And, at age 23, Stacy Lewis is hopeful there will be plenty more experiences like this week.
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Inbee Park won the U.S. Women’s Open on Sunday, did so with an admirable score of 2-under-par 71, finished it off in style with a birdie on No. 18.
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The sound of screaming awakened a 9-year-old child at 3 a.m. and changed the course of her life – or, rather, changed her life to put her on course.
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In victory or defeat, a certain awestruck splendor hovers among the gallery when a legend passes. The quiet whispers of "It’s Annika" from those walking the fairways are stifled by tumultuous applause as Hall of Famer Annika Sorenstam passes.
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The pay-out of prize money for the 2008 U.S. Women's Open Championship
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The scoring trend at the top of the leader board Saturday afternoon in the 63rd U.S. Women’s Open was contrary to established norms. The U.S. Open usually means closed avenues to birdies. It means open season on egos. It means red faces, not red numbers.
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You want a true Cinderella story. Not some fictional Carl Spackler character who whacks his way through a posh country club flower garden to miraculously win the Masters.
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You might think it is surprising to see 23-year old Stacy Lewis atop the 54-hole leader board at the U.S Women’s Open.
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Helen Alfredsson has picked a fine time for her aging game to come together.
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Fans follow your every move, children beg for your signature, and the expectation that you will perform beyond the average bear is sometimes elevated to beyond your reach.
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Patty Berg is everywhere at Interlachen Country Club. Berg died a few years ago, giving up this life for greener grass of a higher sort, but her spirit wafts through this great old club as a benevolent presence felt by many of the people here.
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Michelle Wie waited all night to play three strokes and complete the final hole of her second round in the U.S. Women’s Open Saturday – the same hole that one day earlier effectively ended her chances of further competing at Interlachen Country Club.
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A sparkling list of youthful competitors are making their mark this week at Interlachen Country Club.
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We all know that the early portions of a golf competition can produce some surprising results.
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If this is truly three-time U.S. Women’s Open champion Annika Sorenstam’s 15th and final appearance, then she was going out on her terms.
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Who knows if Angela Park is a big Rod Serling fan. Or if she believes in déjà vu.
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The U.S. Women’s Open may just be a Bizarro World Women’s Open on Friday. For those who aren’t familiar with Superman comic book nostalgia, Bizarro World is where everything is opposite of what it would be in the regular world. You know, new is old, left is right, "yes" is "no."
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With an eye toward unmistakable historical juxtaposition and the promise Friday holds, the second round of the 63rd U.S. Women’s Open at Interlachen Country Club might be the most meaningful in women’s golf this year.
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Interlachen Country Club a pushover? Is it too easy?
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If Annika Sorenstam intends to win her fourth U.S. Women’s Open title, she’ll have to do it from one of the worst starting positions she’s had in her 15 appearances.
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For most teenagers, playing alongside the No. 1 star in women’s professional golf might be a little intimidating. For most amateurs, playing alongside the reigning U.S. Women’s Open champion might be imposing.
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Isn’t this supposed to be the United States Women’s Open?
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Thirteen holes into the first round of the U.S. Women’s Open, Lorena Ochoa found herself three over par and without a birdie on her scorecard. The No. 1 player in the world and the reigning British Open champion decided it was time to abandon her "Open" approach.
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I’m Interlachen Golf Club.
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Earlier this week, Michelle Wie spoke at length about the growing confidence in her game. In Thursday’s opening round of the 2008 U.S. Women’s Open, that belief was severely taxed.
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Perhaps for the first time in her illustrious career, the intensely competitive Annika Sorenstam waved a white flag on Wednesday. Retiring at the end of the year, she is now conceding, as well.
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Does the absence of Tiger Woods from golf’s landscape for the remainder of 2008 impact the LPGA? Does a chicken have lips?
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In her quest for a first U.S. Women’s Open title, Lorena Ochoa reflected back on her best chances in her pre-championship press conference Tuesday.
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The merits of Interlachen Country Club as a worthy site and proper test for a major championship aren’t difficult to enumerate given its architectural heritage, but it never hurts to buttress any conversation by throwing around the name of Bob Jones.
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A year ago Cydney Clanton got an up close and personal view of the U.S. Women’s Open. She checked out the locker room, used the practice areas, mingled with the world’s best golfers and took in the ambiance.
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Three players – Lorena Ochoa, Annika Sorenstam and Paula Creamer – who have combined for 11 of the 16 LPGA Tour victories in 2008 makes picking a favorite for this week’s U.S. Women’s Open a bit difficult.
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As if on an assembly line, balls then gloves were being passed at a torrid pace to his wife, Hilary Lunke, who happily signed away. Contents were going so fast that the 29-year-old might need a visit to the merchandise trailer to replenish her weekly supply.
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Based on her resume alone, Lorena Ochoa is uniquely qualified to speak on the topic of talent.
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The one-time prodigy who suffered through an ignominious 2007 season filled with injury, indecision and unacceptable golf, is back in the U.S. Women’s Open after successfully advancing through qualifying.
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Let’s go back to last summer. How much did winning the U.S. Women’s Open mean for a native of south Florida who often dreamed of winning the national championship?
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A little more than 11 years ago, the plain-looking box arrived unannounced with no return label. It stood upright outside the front door.
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Three-time United States Women’s Open champion and World Golf and LPGA Hall-of-Fame member Annika Sorenstam has been named a United States Golf Association Ambassador, according to USGA President Jim Vernon.
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The scorecard says, at 6,789 yards, Interlachen Country Club will play as the longest-ever U.S. Women’s Open course.
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Hat pulled over her face, tears began erupting from her eyes like a second coming of Mount Vesuvius.
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Golf’s fastest-rising star finally did something she hasn’t done for much of 2008 at the McDonald’s LPGA Championship: trail a fellow competitor.
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Latest News
Inbee-lievable! Park Youngest Women’s Open Champion Ever
Alfredsson, Lewis Fall Short
Hard Day For All
Park Credits Pak For Success
2008 U.S. Women's Open Prize Money (PDF)
Fairy Tale Ending For Sorenstam
The Final Examination
 
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