Record crowds flocked to Lancaster Country Club in 2015 to witness a young Korean star have a breakout week. In Gee Chun rallied on the final day to edge countrywoman Amy Yang by one stroke. The William Flynn design (with recent renovations by the design team of Jim Nagle and Ron Forse) proved to be a tremendous challenge for the game's top female golfers, and should once again provide a stern test. Chun was so beloved by the locals that she continues to come back to Lancaster C.C. to do a fundraiser for local charities. Lancaster C.C. also made her an honorary member.

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A relative newcomer to championship golf, Erin Hills burst onto the scene in the early part of the 21st century by hosting three USGA championships. In fact, it was awarded the 2008 U.S. Women's Amateur Public Links before it even opened to the public. The daily-fee course then hosted the 2011 U.S. Amateur, won by Kelly Kraft in a memorable duel over future multi-PGA Tour winner Patrick Cantlay. And six years later, Brooks Koepka claimed the first of his two consecutive U.S. Open titles. In 2022, Matthew McClean, of Northern Ireland, edged good friend Hugh Foley, of the Republic of Ireland, to win the U.S. Mid-Amateur. That set the stage for the world's best females to challenge the links-style layout just outside of Milwaukee.

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Designed by George C. Thomas Jr. and William Bell, The Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif., opened in 1926. The 2026 U.S. Women's Open will be the club's fourth USGA championship. Ben Hogan won the first of his four U.S. Open Championships in 1948 at Riviera. The club, which was recently renovated in 1992 by the design team of Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw, also hosted the 1998 U.S. Senior Open won by Hale Irwin and the 2017 U.S. Amateur won by Doc Redman in a memorable 37-hole duel against Doug Ghim. It is also the annual site of annual PGA Tour stop (Genesis Open).

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Inverness Club, located in Toledo, Ohio, has previously hosted eight USGA championships, including four U.S. Opens. Inverness was founded in 1903 and its current course was designed by Donald Ross in 1916. Among its historic moments, Inverness is where four-time champion Bob Jones first competed in a U.S. Open, and it most recently hosted the 2019 U.S. Junior Amateur (Preston Summerhays) and the 2021 Solheim Cup won by Team Europe. The club also is scheduled to host the 2029 U.S. Amateur. Andrew Green completed a restoration of the Ross design in 2018. U.S. Open champions at Inverness include Ted Ray (1920), Billy Burke (1931), Dick Mayer (1957) and Hale Irwin (1979). Burke had a memorable 72-hole playoff -- he and 1926 U.S. Amateur champion George Von Elm were tied after 72 and 108 holes -- while Ray lost a playoff (with countryman Harry Vardon) to Francis Ouimet in the 1913 U.S. Open at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. Craig Stadler also won a U.S. Amateur at Inverness Club in 1973.

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Considered to be one of the sternest layouts in championship golf anywhere in the world, Oakmont will once again host the world's top female golfers. This will be the third U.S. Women's Open contested on the venerable western Pennsylvania layout, with Patty Sheehan (1992) and Paula Creamer (2010) previously prevailing here. Several memorable U.S. Opens have been staged on the William Fownes design, including Dustin Johnson's victory in 2016. Ben Hogan won here in 1953, the year he claimed three of the four major championships. Johnny Miller fired a historic final-round 63 at Oakmont to win the 1973 U.S. Open and Larry Nelson edged Tom Watson to take the 1983 U.S. Open. Arnold Palmer played his final U.S. Open here in 1994 when Ernie Els claimed the title in a playoff. Nick Flanagan (2003) and James Piot (2021) won recent U.S. Amateurs contested at Oakmont.

Pinehurst Resort & Country Club's Course No. 2, site of the 2024 U.S. Open Championship, will host its second “back-to-back” championships in 2029. This will be the second U.S. Women’s Open at Pinehurst, with Michelle Wie West earning her first major championship here in 2014. Martin Kaymer won the U.S. Open a week earlier, going wire-to-wire. Pinehurst, which was named the Association’s first anchor site in September 2020, has hosted 12 USGA championships, including the first two U.S. Adaptive Opens on Course No. 6, and will be the site of five U.S. Opens over the next 25 years. The last USGA championship contested at Pinehurst No. 2 was the 2019 U.S. Amateur, won by Andy Ogletree. Course No. 2 is one of the iconic designs by legendary architect Donald Ross. The course was restored to Ross' original intention by Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw prior to the back-to-back U.S. Opens in 2014. 

Interlachen will host its second U.S. Women’s Open and sixth USGA championship overall. The 2030 U.S. Women’s Open will be played on the 100th anniversary of Bob Jones’s U.S. Open victory at Interlachen, his third major triumph that season en route to the Grand Slam. He'd finish the feat in the U.S. Amateur at Merion. The club has replica trophies of all four of his major wins in 1930: the British Open, British Amateur, U.S. Open and U.S. Amateur.  The club also hosted the 1935 U.S. Women’s Amateur, the 1986 U.S. Senior Amateur, the 1993 Walker Cup and the 2008 U.S. Women’s Open, won by then 19-year-old Inbee Park. Interlachen retained Andrew Green to do restorative work to its Donald Ross design. Robert Trent Jones Sr. and Geoffrey Cornish also have done work on the layout.

In 2031, Oakland Hills Country Club in suburban Detroit, will host its 13th USGA championship and first U.S. Women’s Open. In 2024, the club hosted the U.S. Junior Amateur. It will become the fifth club to have hosted a U.S. Open, U.S. Women’s Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Women’s Amateur, with Pebble Beach achieving that feat in 2023. The South Course, which has hosted six U.S. Opens, was designed by Donald Ross and opened in 1918. It was renovated by Robert Trent Jones (1950), Rees Jones (2006) and Gil Hanse (2021). In 2016, it hosted the U.S. Amateur, won by Curtis Luck. Steve Jones won the last U.S. Open at Oakland Hills in 2016. Jack Nickaus also won a U.S. Senior Open in 1991 in a playoff over Chi Chi Rodriguez. Oakland Hills also has hosted three PGA Championships and a Ryder Cup (2004). A fire in May of 2022 destroyed the clubhouse along with several of historic artifacts from its championship pedigree. The new structure should be in place when the U.S. Women's Open is staged at the club.    

For many years, the George C. Thomas-designed North Course at The Los Angeles Country Club was a hidden gem in the City of Angels. But when the USGA brought the 2017 Walker Cup Match to the venue, many in the outside world finally got a glimpse of this gem located in the heart of Century City. The 2023 U.S. Open, won by Wyndham Clark, added to the club's legacy. In 2032, the world's best female golfers will get their opportunity to make history on the layout. The club did host the 1930 U.S. Women's Amateur and 1954 U.S. Junior Amateur, but then closed itself off to the outside world for half a century. The membership decided it was time to showcase this magnificent facility to the world after the North Course underwent an extensive renovation by Gil Hanse in 2010. It reached out to the USGA expressing interest in hosting the 2017 Walker Cup, which led to the club landing the 2023 U.S. Open, and now the 2032 U.S. Women's Open as well as the U.S. Open again in 2039.

The Fourth Hole of the Chicago Golf Club  in Wheaton, IL as seen on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016.  (Copyright USGA/Fred Vuich)

Chicago Golf Club, one of the five founding clubs of the USGA, will host its first U.S. Women's Open in 2033. The iconic C.B. Macdonald design located in Wheaton, Ill., was the site of the inaugural U.S. Senior Women's Open in 2018, won by Laura Davies. It also hosted the 2005 Walker Cup Match, which saw the USA hang on for an exciting one-point victory over Great Britain & Ireland to regain the Cup. Chicago Golf Club hosted the 1897, 1900 and 1911 U.S. Opens, the latter won by John McDermott. The 1928 Walker Cup also was contested here. 

While the men have staged several memorable U.S. Opens at Merion, the women have never had the opportunity to hold its marquee championship on this Main Line gem. Ben Hogan hit his famous 1-iron approach to the 72nd hole, a shot that was captured in the iconic photo by Hy Peskin. Eighteen months removed from a near-fatal automobile accident, Hogan prevailed in the 1950 U.S. Open in a playoff. Lee Trevino edged Jack Nicklaus in a 1971 playoff for the second of his two U.S. Open titles. In 2013, Justin Rose rallied past Phil Mickelson to take the championship. This was also the site where Bob Jones completed his 1930 Grand Slam by winning the U.S. Amateur. Edoardo Molinari became the first Italian winner of the U.S. Amateur in 2005, advancing to match play via a playoff. The USA also retained the Curtis Cup here in 2022. Merion has hosted more USGA championships than any other venue (currently at 19 through 2023).

A longtime venue for the PGA Tour's annual AT&T National Pro-Am and the site of six previous U.S. Opens, Pebble Beach Golf Links will host its second U.S. Women's Open in 2035. Allisen Corpuz claimed the 2023 U.S. Women's Open at Pebble Beach for her first major championship. Pebble last hosted the U.S. Open in 2019 when Gary Woodland held off Brooks Koepka, who was seeking a historic third consecutive title. Pebble also was the site of Tiger Woods' record-setting, 15-stroke victory in 2000 when he was the only competitor to break par, shooting a 12-under-par 272. In 1972, Jack Nicklaus hit a memorable 1-iron to the par-3 71st hole to secure the third of his four U.S. Open titles, and 10 years later, Tom Watson holed a chip on that very same hole from greenside rough to prevent Nicklaus from a record fifth U.S. Open title. Tom Kite (1992) and Graeme McDowell also won U.S. Opens at Pebble. Nicklaus (1961), David Gossett (1999) and Viktor Hovland (2018) captured U.S. Amateur titles at Pebble.

A view of Shinnecock Hills Golf Course as photographed in 2002 in Southampton, N.Y. (Copyright USGA)

Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, one of the five founding clubs of the USGA, will make history in 2036 by hosting the U.S. Women's Open and U.S. Open in consecutive weeks. This will be the seventh U.S. Open at the club, but first U.S. Women's Open. Shinnecock Hills will host the U.S. Open in 2026. In 2018, Brooks Koepka became the first player to successfully defend his U.S. Open title since Curtis Strange (1988-89). The historic, links-style course that overlooks Great Peconic Bay is one of the world's most iconic venues. Shinnecock Hills hosted the 1896 U.S. Open and U.S. Amateur, as well as the 1900 U.S. Women’s Amateur before being redesigned by William Flynn in 1937. In 2013, the noted design team of Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw enhanced the course for the 118th U.S. Open. Raymond Floyd (1986), Corey Pavin (1995) and Retief Goosen (2004) have also claimed U.S. Open titles at Shinnecock Hills.

The 4th Hole at Oakmont Country Club as seen on 7/20/20.  (Copyright USGA/Fred Vuich)

Considered to be one of the sternest layouts in championship golf anywhere in the world, Oakmont will host the world's top female golfers for a fourth time. It previously hosted the U.S. Women's Open in 1992 (Patty Sheehan), 2010 (Paula Creamer) and 2028 (TBD). Several memorable U.S. Opens have been staged on the William Fownes design, including Dustin Johnson's victory in 2016. Ben Hogan won here in 1953, the year he claimed three of the four major championships. Johnny Miller fired a historic final-round 63 at Oakmont to win the 1973 U.S. Open and Larry Nelson edged Tom Watson to take the 1983 U.S. Open. Arnold Palmer played his final U.S. Open here in 1994 when Ernie Els claimed the title in a playoff. Nick Flanagan (2003) and James Piot (2021) won recent U.S. Amateurs contested at Oakmont.

A longtime venue for the PGA Tour's annual AT&T National Pro-Am and the site of six previous U.S. Opens, Pebble Beach Golf Links will host its third U.S. Women's Open in 2040. It is also scheduled to host the championship again in 2048. Allisen Corpuz claimed the 2023 U.S. Women's Open at Pebble Beach for her first major championship. Pebble last hosted the U.S. Open in 2019 when Gary Woodland held off Brooks Koepka, who was seeking a historic third consecutive title. Pebble also was the site of Tiger Woods' record-setting, 15-stroke victory in 2000 when he was the only competitor to break par, shooting a 12-under-par 272. In 1972, Jack Nicklaus hit a memorable 1-iron to the par-3 71st hole to secure the third of his four U.S. Open titles, and 10 years later, Tom Watson holed a chip on that very same hole from greenside rough to prevent Nicklaus from a record fifth U.S. Open title. Tom Kite (1992) and Graeme McDowell also won U.S. Opens at Pebble. Nicklaus (1961), David Gossett (1999) and Viktor Hovland (2018) captured U.S. Amateur titles at Pebble.

The ninth hole of Oakland Hills Country Club (South Course) in the Bloomfield Hills, Mich. on Sunday, July 9, 2023.  (Copyright USGA/Bill Hornstein)

In 2042, Oakland Hills Country Club in suburban Detroit, will host its second U.S. Women’s Open, 11 years after first bringing the championship to the venerable South Course. In 2024, the club hosted the U.S. Junior Amateur. In 2031, it became the fifth club to have hosted a U.S. Open, U.S. Women’s Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Women’s Amateur, with Pebble Beach achieving that feat in 2023. The South Course, which has hosted six U.S. Opens (and will host its seventh in 2034 and eighth in 2051), was designed by Donald Ross and opened in 1918. It was renovated by Robert Trent Jones (1950), Rees Jones (2006) and Gil Hanse (2021). In 2016, it hosted the U.S. Amateur, won by Curtis Luck. Steve Jones won the last U.S. Open at Oakland Hills in 2016. Jack Nickaus also won a U.S. Senior Open in 1991 in a playoff over Chi Chi Rodriguez. Oakland Hills also has hosted three PGA Championships and a Ryder Cup (2004). A fire in May of 2022 destroyed the clubhouse along with several of historic artifacts from its championship pedigree.    

The 18th Hole of The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. as seen on Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2021.  (Copyright USGA/John Mummert)

For the first time in the club's rich history, a U.S. Women's Open will be staged at The Country Club, one of the five founding clubs of the USGA. Four U.S. Opens have been staged here, and a fifth will be contested in 2038. Three of the four Opens have gone to playoffs, including the 1913 championship, which saw amateur Francis Ouimet take down English stalwarts Harry Vardon and Ted Ray. Ouimet would go on to become one of the great ambassadors for amateur golf in America. Julius Boros (1963), Curtis Strange (1988) and Matt Fitzpatrick (2022) also claimed U.S. Opens at TCC, the latter having also won the 2013 U.S. Amateur at the venue.

The 9th Hole as seen at Merion Golf Club’s East Course in Ardmore, PA on Thursday, Aug. 5, 2021.  (Copyright USGA/Fred Vuich)

The women will get a second opportunity to play iconic Merion for a U.S. Women's Open in 2046, 12 years after hosting the championship for the first time. Merion has been the site of many U.S. Open Championships, including in 1950 when Ben Hogan hit his famous 1-iron approach to the 72nd hole, a shot that was captured in the iconic photo by Hy Peskin. Eighteen months removed from a near-fatal automobile accident, Hogan prevailed in a playoff for the second of his four titles. Lee Trevino edged Jack Nicklaus in a 1971 playoff for the second of his two U.S. Open titles. In 2013, Justin Rose rallied past Phil Mickelson to take the championship. This was also the site where Bob Jones completed his 1930 Grand Slam by winning the U.S. Amateur. Edoardo Molinari became the first Italian winner of the U.S. Amateur in 2005, advancing to match play via a playoff. The USA also retained the Curtis Cup here in 2022. Merion has hosted more USGA championships than any other venue (currently at 19 through 2023).

A longtime venue for the PGA Tour's annual AT&T National Pro-Am and the site of six previous U.S. Opens, Pebble Beach Golf Links will host its fourth U.S. Women's Open in 2048. Allisen Corpuz claimed the first U.S. Women's Open at Pebble Beach in 2023 for her first major championship. Pebble last hosted the U.S. Open in 2019 when Gary Woodland held off Brooks Koepka, who was seeking a historic third consecutive title. Pebble also was the site of Tiger Woods' record-setting, 15-stroke victory in 2000 when he was the only competitor to break par, shooting a 12-under-par 272. In 1972, Jack Nicklaus hit a memorable 1-iron to the par-3 71st hole to secure the third of his four U.S. Open titles, and 10 years later, Tom Watson holed a chip on that very same hole from greenside rough to prevent Nicklaus from a record fifth U.S. Open title. Tom Kite (1992) and Graeme McDowell also won U.S. Opens at Pebble. Nicklaus (1961), David Gossett (1999) and Viktor Hovland (2018) captured U.S. Amateur titles at Pebble.